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 Post subject: C46
PostPosted: Sat Feb 13, 2016 5:59 pm 
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Hi all, I'm new here. I am trying to find out about a C46 Commando that was supposed to have been saved from the scrapper last year and taken to Israel for display at the Atlit Detention Camp Museum. Apparently it was an ex-Argentina airframe?
Forgive me if i have posted this in the wrong spot, just trying to figure this site out at the moment.
Anybody got any new info on this or pictures?


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 Post subject: Re: C46
PostPosted: Sun Feb 14, 2016 2:11 am 
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Welcome to WIX, Mick. There's a lot of very knowledgeable people here and a lot of great information, news, and opinion gets shared among them. I think you will find the "search" feature extremely useful. It works best on more uncommon words. A general term like "C-46" will produce an avalanche of results, while entering a specific and unusual name like "Atlit" returns just two (your question and a 2 page thread from January of 2015).

Here's what people were saying about this story one year ago ...

http://www.warbirdinformationexchange.org/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=55001&hilit=Atlit

Perhaps someone out there has some additional news.


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 Post subject: Re: C46
PostPosted: Sun Feb 14, 2016 12:54 pm 
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Thanks for that TB, it confirms the rumor. Seeings how its a year ago, does anybody have any newer info on the serial number or pictures? I cant seem to find any images online and am curious if they were successful in relocating it.


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 Post subject: Re: C46
PostPosted: Thu Feb 18, 2016 10:30 pm 
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I'm not sure how many of you are interested, but the I always had a soft spot for the Commando.

Anyway, I contacted the Atlit Museum and got this response:

Hello Mick,
Generally- the rumors are correct. There is a c-46 airplane that is supposed to be sent to the Atlit Detention Camp heritage center.
We have not yet received it and we don't know when exactly it will be sent to Israel.
You can contact us again in a few months to see if there are any changes. I believe there will be some kind of an announcement when there is something to report.
Kind regards,

Thought I might share this info, I wonder what the hold up is? Its been over a year now since the original announcement. I'd still like to see pictures or get some more information on the airframe that is in question if anybody has any info.
Mick


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 Post subject: Re: C46
PostPosted: Wed Nov 16, 2016 9:02 pm 
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I have some news on the C46 that the Atlit Detention Camp Museum acquired. The plane is actually coming out of Alaska, not Argentina as previously reported. It is currently disassembled, crated and is in transit through the port of Seattle with expectation to arrive in Israel in about 2 months time.

Everts confirmed to me yesterday that it is registration N23AC (SN# 22451) nice to see it get saved as there are fewer examples every year.

This particular aircraft has a very colorful past, having been owned by the CIA operatives and likely involved in many clandestine operations into Central and South America.

On a side note, a Derelict C46 airframe in Bolivia was just scrapped Oct/Nov of this year. It was former NEBA (North Eastern Bolivian Airways) CP1616. Hard to believe that some of these WW2 planes have little appeal for saving. Seems the Fighters & Bombers get all of the attention. People will go to extraordinary lengths to raise aircraft off the sea floor and painstakingly rebuild, and all the while there are other types of warbirds just sitting in reasonable good shape that get the scrappers torch. I can see future generations cringing at the lost opportunity.............


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 Post subject: Re: C46
PostPosted: Wed Nov 16, 2016 11:04 pm 
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It's cost, nothing else.

To restore a C-46 will take a million+ unless it's been in a hangar for 70 years. And none of them have been.

To operate it costs the expense of 2 R-2800s, plus everything else.

And you need a very large hangar to protect the investment -- which costs a lot.

In return you get an airplane which will not generate much revenue because it lacks the appeal of bombers or fighters. Airshows will not pay its true cost for appearances, and passengers will not flock to it.

This sort of thing is not just about money, true -- passion plays a great role. and we're all thankful for that. But no one throws money away for no purpose. There nearly always has to be a business case.

It's reality.

Dave


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 Post subject: Re: C46
PostPosted: Thu Nov 17, 2016 2:15 am 
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Colorful history indeed (re-arranged a bit for clarity):
Joe Baugher wrote:
(44-)78628 (MSN 22451) Lend-Lease to China. To XT registry with China National Aviation Corp., to N8369C, then to XT-130, to B-130 Mar 1959 Civil Air Transport. To HP-316 Oct 20, 1960, "Sold" to Southern Air Transport Sep 14, 1961, flown as '857' in Bay of Pigs operation Sep 1961. Registered as N74811 Oct 11, 1961. Lease purchased by Rosenbaum Aviation Nov 24, 1973. Lease purchased by International Airlines Academy, 2 Sep 75. Transferred to Trans Continental Airlines (Willow Run) Feb 1978. Sold to F A Conner Aug 11, 1978. Sold to Cryderman Air Services Inc, operated as Century Airlines 11 Aug 78. To N777AF Nov 1985. To N18AC Oct 1995, to N23AC Oct 15, 1997.


The one they just scrapped was from the same serial block, fifty later:
Joe Baugher wrote:
(44-)78678 (MSN 22501/CU2610) to Foreign Liquidation Commission Apr 10, 1948. Bought by Biscayne Aircraft Corp in 1946 and registered as N5617V. To Trans-Air Hawaii Ltd in 1948. Bought by Flying Tiger Line in 1949. Bought by Aaxico Airlines Dec 29, 1951. Leased to Riddle Airlines and returned to Aaxico Airlines. Bought
by Canadian Pacific Airlines Feb 1955 and registered as CF-CZK. Converted to Super C-46C. Bought by Carolina Aircraft Corp Mar 1963 and registered as N355K. Bought by Airstar Inc in 1966. Bought by Kendall Aircraft Leasing in 1976 and registered as N8875. Rebuilt with parts from N355CC (42-107368) and then leased to Air Haiti (Air Adeah) Dec 1976 as HH-AHE but NTU and returned May 1980. Bought by North East Bolivian Airways (Cochabamba Bolivia-NEBA) Sep 1980 and registered as CP-1616.

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 Post subject: Re: C46
PostPosted: Fri Nov 18, 2016 2:36 pm 
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Dave Hadfield wrote:
It's cost, nothing else.

To restore a C-46 will take a million+ unless it's been in a hangar for 70 years. And none of them have been.

To operate it costs the expense of 2 R-2800s, plus everything else.

And you need a very large hangar to protect the investment -- which costs a lot.

In return you get an airplane which will not generate much revenue because it lacks the appeal of bombers or fighters. Airshows will not pay its true cost for appearances, and passengers will not flock to it.

This sort of thing is not just about money, true -- passion plays a great role. and we're all thankful for that. But no one throws money away for no purpose. There nearly always has to be a business case.

It's reality.

Dave



Dave.
I have to disagree. It might be about money for some, and if there is a business strategy behind it to generate income, but not all warbirds need to be brought back to airworthy status. Having them displayed outdoors is not as great as a hanger, but generally its not too big of a problem. Simply preserving them for static display is better than scrapping. I am sure future generations will look back at our cavalier attitude with these machines. If preserved, at least the option exists 50 years from now to return to the skies if somebody was really that determined.

The costs to ferry would easily be $250K, but the wings and empennage could be removed and this could be transported by truck. Probably $100K to bring back into North America. Hardly a price for a museum to pay to acquire a genuine WW2 aircraft.


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 Post subject: Re: C46
PostPosted: Tue Feb 21, 2017 2:47 pm 
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Well here is the link:

I have translated it below.

Too bad there weren't any examples in Europe, i guess this will be the closest for anyone on that side of the pond.

http://www.ynet.co.il/articles/0,7340,L-4925329,00.html

Translated:
After 70 years: Plane Iraqi immigrants in Israel
70 years after the first flight to bring the Jews of Iraq, will come to Israel this morning participated in the operation model aircraft displayed at the museum immigration and Atlit. Shlomo Hillel, who commanded the operation: "We did it under the noses of the Iraqi and British"
Audi Atzionforsm: 21/02/17, 10:14

"It was a breakthrough - the first air-illegal immigration operation, the most dangerous place in the world, under the noses of the British and the Iraqis," recalls Shlomo Hillel (94), an Israel Prize laureate, former Speaker of the Knesset and government minister, who commanded the operation in 1947 "Miiklbrg", which raised about 100 Jews to Israel from Iraq.
 
This morning (Tuesday) will close the circle of a 70 year old, when ZIM logging Haifa port will bring a plane Curtis 46C Commando - transport plane American model used in the operation, and subsequently gained widespread use even in the War of Independence by force Hauer young Israeli - mostly as a transport , and also occasional bomber.
 
Piloting the Jews of Iraq as part of Operation Miiklbrg in 1947 (Photo: Miiklbrg)
Piloting the Jews of Iraq as part of Operation Miiklbrg in 1947 (Photo: Miiklbrg)
The plane, comes disassembled, will be comprised of Atlit immigration museum again, and a new display center will perpetuate the operation and raising the Iraqi Jews and Yemen through airlifts, that followed.
 
For several years the preservation council, which operates the museum, looking for such aircraft worldwide, there is also a collection of aircraft at the base of Jacob Turner premises. "Out of 3,000 aircraft produced commandos participated in World War II, remain today only ten flight mode," says Moti Boness, a former aerospace industry executive, who runs the operation brought the plane. "We already found one in Haiti, but then the government changed and the deal fell apart. Then we got to 'Aoorts Air, Alaska, still carries four such planes," he added.
 
The plane had been dismantled and will arrive in Israel (Photo: Moti Boness)
The plane had been dismantled and will arrive in Israel (Photo: Moti Boness)
The American company has agreed to give up the plane held and not flying, completed the parts that lacked it, dismantled the wings from the body, and then, the operation funded by donors, he traveled overland and long days.
 
"Near the plane's put Lobby tell the story of aerial illegal immigration from Arab countries, and visitors will be able to enter the plane, see the reconstructed cockpit and sit on the floor of the aircraft, as sitting in the world from Iraq," said Omri Salmon, CEO of the Preservation Council.
 
 (Photo: Evert Air)
(Photo: Evert Air)

 (Photo: Moti Boness)
(Photo: Moti Boness)
Operation "Miiklbrg", named after two American pilots who carried him for 5,000 pounds - Captain Michael and co-pilot and Messenberg - all three flights to Iraq and Europe. They all took place while the British still ruled the land of Israel, and were conducted under real danger to the lives of those involved on the part of Iraqi authorities and the threat of imprisonment by the British. to reduce the risk of getting caught, the plane landed in a field near Yavneel, and an airport official and guarded by the Mandate authorities. tough commando was only one aircraft was able to land and take off in such conditions.
 
"At dawn we saw the Sea of ​​Galilee," said former Air Force journal Rose Marble Almozlino late, later itself MK and Sarah, then a rising excited arrived on the first flight, which landed on Friday, August 23, 1947. "We started singing the songs Rachel, and tears flowed from the eyes. It was the happiest moment of my life. "
 
The operation ended after three flights. "Defense Command did not let us go on," recalls Shlomo Hillel. "It was feared that if flights are discovered, they jeopardize the planned UN vote on the partition plan. It was also clear that we are facing a war and Haganah wanted to take the plane to bring European settlement weapons needed him so much. Now we can show to the general public unknown episodes Aerospace illegal immigration and add existing museum the story of the rise of Middle Eastern Jewry "


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