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Classic Wings Magazine Luftwaffe Resource Center WWII Naval Aviation Research Pacific
Final Cut-The Post War B-17 Flying Fortress and Survivors - 5th Edition


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 19, 2013 12:15 pm 
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Anyone know if the HH-34 has been spoken for?
BTW: is it a real HH-34 (ex-USN used by USAFR in the 70s) or just a H-34 painted in USAF colors?

BTW: I'd like to make a model of one...anyone know if there are decals available for it in 1/48th?

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 19, 2013 2:53 pm 
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The H-34 is supposed to go to Pacific Aviation Museum in Hawaii. It is a real Navy to A.F. aircraft.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 24, 2013 3:01 pm 
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I guess they have room for a G-2... :roll:
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Military crews in central Georgia are preparing to move a jet donated by actor John Travolta to its new home in an aviation museum.

Robins Air Force Base officials said workers on Wednesday were removing the tail section of the Gulfstream G-2 executive jet in preparation for its move to the Museum of Aviation in Warner Robins.

Travolta, who is a pilot, donated the plane in honor of his son Jett, who died in 2009.

The plane will soon be on exhibit in the museum.


Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/Crew ... z2RPeoAPyk

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 25, 2013 8:26 am 
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While it would have been churlish to decline a donation, a G2 has no place in that museum.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 25, 2013 9:00 am 
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By accepting a donation like that you did a few things,

1) Built a relationship with a person that loves aviation and could be a possible donor toward an aircraft restoration, or expansion.

2) Added an aircraft to the collection that the general public would get excited to see. People love to see aircraft and cars and such owned by celebs.

3) Got your museum media attention and a new exhibit for free.

I actually talked with the museum director while I was there. He is a great guy. What he is doing with the aircraft is the responsible thing. There are so many museums that let their aircraft just sit and turn to crap, but will not hear of either turning the aircraft back in, or rethinking their museum goals.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 25, 2013 11:20 am 
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Warbirdnerd wrote:
I guess they have room for a G-2... :roll:
Quote:
Military crews in central Georgia are preparing to move a jet donated by actor John Travolta to its new home in an aviation museum.

Robins Air Force Base officials said workers on Wednesday were removing the tail section of the Gulfstream G-2 executive jet in preparation for its move to the Museum of Aviation in Warner Robins.

Travolta, who is a pilot, donated the plane in honor of his son Jett, who died in 2009.

The plane will soon be on exhibit in the museum.


Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/Crew ... z2RPeoAPyk



OK, let me explain something, the G-2 was donated to the Georgia Aviation Hall of Fame which is housed at the Museum of Flight, two different museums.
http://www.gaaviationhalloffame.com/
and yes the Epps family there is the same Epps I work for, Pat Epps is my boss. (I am real proud to say) 8)
Robbie

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 25, 2013 2:51 pm 
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Robbie Stuart wrote:
OK, let me explain something, the G-2 was donated to the Georgia Aviation Hall of Fame which is housed at the Museum of Flight, two different museums.
Got it!


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 27, 2013 11:44 pm 
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it's not "sequestration"........ it's "castration" for aviation history!!

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 29, 2013 7:05 am 
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And the home of Gulfstream is Savannah, GA.

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PostPosted: Wed May 08, 2013 4:35 pm 
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An update from the director who did a great job laying out the strategy of what and why they are letting 30+ go.
http://museumofaviation.wordpress.com/2 ... um-update/

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By now many of you have heard that the Museum of Aviation is downsizing the aircraft collection. In light of the 50% manpower cut at the beginning of 2012 and a shrinking budget allocation for the Museum from the USAF, we’ve had to take a hard look at what we can do to maintain a quality collection, one the community and USAF can be proud of.

The National Museum of the USAF (NMUSAF), the owner of all our aircraft, made it very clear: If you can’t take care of it, you shouldn’t have it. And NMUSAF is right. So in 2011 we put a collections team together to determine what we needed to do and how to do it. It quickly became obvious that we had too many aircraft, especially outside, for us to take care of in light of the significantly reduced resources. When we started we had no idea what the right answer was other than “fewer.” After three rounds of cuts the number emerged to be 32 or about a one-third reduction in the number of aircraft. Some were easy, many were hard.

As we started the elimination process we took the easy cuts first: the duplicates, the airframes serving as sources of parts for restoration projects, some airplanes we were holding for the NMUSAF and considering keeping, and a couple of long-term restoration projects that were best to just let go. That was round 1.

Round 2 got harder, picking more birds to let go, knowing that we had to let some of the big aircraft go because they are the real resource consumers and would likely stay outside in the weather and continue to deteriorate. We looked too for possible future replacements for ones we’d let go now. The EC-135N is a good example. The aircraft we really want is the KC-135R “Cherokee Rose” Stratotanker that set a number of time-to-climb records right here at Robins while assigned to the 19th Air Refueling Wing in the 1980s. She’s still on duty today, flying the mission, but when she retires we want her here. Tough as it was, we decided to let the EC-135N go now and wait for the “Rose.”

Round 3 got really tough. Big airplanes, little airplanes had to go to align the collection with what we could take care of. We felt strongly that we needed to do everything we could to save certain big, rare airplanes, such as the C-124 Globemaster II and the C-141C Starlifter.

The C-124 was the backbone of the American military air transport fleet during the 1950s and into the 1960s. They operated from Robins Air Force Base for years. There are only nine C-124s left in the world. There’s no replacing the Museum’s example.

Same for the C-141C. There are only 13 left in the world. The C-141 was a major workload at the Warner RobinsAirLogisticsCenter for decades. This classic jet replaced the C-124 as the workhorse of the USAF’s strategic airlift mission from the 1970s into the early 2000s. The aircraft on display at the Museum was the last C-141 to go through programmed depot maintenance at Robins AFB.

And so the B-52 emerged as a candidate to declare excess. It was on the eve of our repainting the aircraft and we got a close look at the real condition of this magnificent bird. We were heartbroken when we realized how badly it has suffered after over 30 years on outside display.

The engine cowlings are made mostly of magnesium. Much of the cowling edges literally dissolved in the weather and a massive rebuild was needed. But it was too much for us, so we put metal tape over the damage where we could and painted over it.

Areas of the wing leading edges have rows and rows of popped rivets indicating significant corrosion below. The wing flaps have hundreds if not thousands of popped rivets too. The tops of the wings have intergranular corrosion (kind of like rust) that has entered into the main wing surfaces and numerous other areas.

We removed and replaced some badly damaged panels but for the most part all we could do was knock off the top layer of corrosion and paint it as best we could. And that’s just on the surface. We can only imagine what’s happening in the aircraft’s structure. It was just too much to tackle knowing it was going to continue to deteriorate outside in the weather. Yet, there is the possibility of replacing this aircraft some day with one of the B-52s still flying today.

When the elimination process was over, we had carefully considered each aircraft and large missile in the collection, racked, stacked, cussed and discussed and settled on 32 aircraft as excess. We hope we are done cutting and can handle what is left. NMUSAF has already found new homes for a number of aircraft and directed us to dispose of others. We’re waiting for instructions on about half the excess aircraft.

The big outside planes are the most challenging and costly in manpower and money to maintain. We desperately need a large exhibit hangar to protect aircraft like the B-52, C-141, C-124, and B-1. Regrettably, there is no funding to build a new hangar and preserve these historic aircraft to inspire people of all ages and educate them on the roles and missions of Robins Air Force Base and the USAF.

As Director, the final responsibility for the wellbeing and sustainability of the Museum of Aviation is mine. I first got involved with the Museum before it opened in 1982 and since then have guided dozens of aircraft to the Museum for display and preservation. No one is more pained than I to see many of the same aircraft I worked so hard to bring here let go. But we must do this to save the rest.

As you are well away, these are difficult and austere times and our USAF is under tremendous fiscal pressures. While the Museum of Aviation provides a valuable service to the USAF, Robins Air Force Base, and the community, there are no guarantees. The challenges we face are much bigger than letting go of some airplanes.

We are at a fork in the road. Do we slip into mediocrity or excel into greatness? A discussion for another time as we try to survive now and save what we can until better times. We do not expect you to agree with our decisions, but we do ask you to understand that something had to be done and we considered, evaluated and did the best we could to make the most out of a decidedly unpleasant task.

Still, there are many reasons to be hopeful. We are working hard and pressing forward. There are a lot of good things happening here. Thank you for your support of the Museum of Aviation.

Ken Emery

Director

Museum of Aviation

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PostPosted: Wed May 08, 2013 5:18 pm 
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Interesting. I wonder what will happen to the Connie?

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PostPosted: Wed May 08, 2013 8:24 pm 
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the truth hurts. a sad commentary indeed, but it kind of boosts me up that the museum is still taking a positive approach & attitude.

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tom d. friedman - hey!!! those fokkers were messerschmitts!! * without ammunition, the usaf would be just another flying club!!! * better to have piece of mind than piece of tail!!


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PostPosted: Thu May 09, 2013 12:03 pm 
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I'd welcome the chance to see a G-II (Grumman and Gulfstream always used Roman numerals)in a museum...(but not at the expense of a more historic type..and since it's not replacing the military AC at the W-R museum, I have no complaints).
They were the top of the line bizjet...now sadly long in the tooth with low value.
While working at the Boise airport in 1979, I got to go aboard a brand new II owned by US Gypsum ...the captain had me take my shoes off, less I track airport ramp exhaust stains onto the off-white wool carpet. It also had custom china with gold leaf rims, cut crystal glasses, the works.

I enjoy looking at the Lear 23 at Pima (especially with the pure 60s velour and zebra stripe interior..and it's a way to show people how small they are, not the walk-around interior you see on TV) and I'm a fan of business/private/GA aircraft and it's always good to see some old ones saved.

There is more to aviation than Mustangs and Spitfires....

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PostPosted: Thu May 09, 2013 12:29 pm 
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JohnB wrote:
I'd welcome the chance to see a G-II (Grumman and Gulfstream always used Roman numerals)in a museum...(but not at the expense of a more historic type..and since it's not replacing the military AC at the W-R museum, I have no complaints).
They were the top of the line bizjet...now sadly long in the tooth with low value.
While working at the Boise airport in 1979, I got to go aboard a brand new II owned by US Gypsum ...the captain had me take my shoes off, less I track airport ramp exhaust stains onto the off-white wool carpet. It also had custom china with gold leaf rims, cut crystal glasses, the works.

I enjoy looking at the Lear 23 at Pima (especially with the pure 60s velour and zebra stripe interior..and it's a way to show people how small they are, not the walk-around interior you see on TV) and I'm a fan of business/private/GA aircraft and it's always good to see some old ones saved.

There is more to aviation than Mustangs and Spitfires....


You know we have a G-I and a G-II as well as the Lear 23, right?
James


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PostPosted: Mon May 04, 2015 10:52 am 
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Now that some time has passed, what's the status of this downsize?

Ken

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