Warbird Information Exchange

DISCLAIMER: The views expressed on this site are the responsibility of the poster and do not reflect the views of the management.
It is currently Tue Sep 02, 2014 11:35 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Click here to goto Amazon.com


Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 20 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Thu Nov 15, 2012 8:21 pm 
Offline
3000+ Post Club
3000+ Post Club
User avatar

Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 1:48 pm
Posts: 3297
Location: On the road
Renamed the original thread from a few weeks ago and added a few images at the bottom of the thread.

Thought some of you may enjoy this thread ... With the 71st year of the attack on Pearl Harbor (harbour) coming up in a few weeks, maybe a couple of these images you haven't seen before. Of course many battles, strikes and missions are not represented here so I've tried a modest attempt to put together a reasonable idea of what happened at Pearl Harbor and what it took to get the US Navy to the end of the journey. Sources San Diego Air and Space Museum archives, National Museum of Naval Aviation archives, Library of Congress archives, my personal collection.

The first few images before hostilities began ...

Image
View of the flightline at Naval Air Station NAS Ford Island in Pearl Harbor during late 1938

Image
Pearl Harbor Hawaii showing the battleship West Virginia BB48 making a turn at Hospital Point and the aircraft carrier Langley off to the left.

Image
Aerial view of Naval Base Pearl Harbor Hawaii 13 October 1941

Image
Aerial view of the submarine base and fuel tank storage area at Naval Base Pearl Harbor Hawaii 13 October 1941

Image
Aerial view of US Naval Base Pearl Harbor November 1941

Image
A hangar burns at Naval Air Station NAS Ford Island during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor 7 December 1941

Image
Gunners man a sand bagged position during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor

Image
Personnel inspect a damaged hangar at Naval Air Station NAS Ford Island in the aftermath of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor December 1941

Image
View of a burning hangar at Naval Air Station (NAS) Ford Island in the aftermath of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, 7 December 1941.

Image
View of a burned out hangar on Naval Air Station (NAS) Ford Island in the aftermath of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, 1941

Image
View of hangars burning and aircraft wreckage on Naval Air Station (NAS) Ford Island in the aftermath of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, 1941.

Image
Aerial view of destruction at Naval Air Station (NAS) Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, in the aftermath of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.

Image
Sailors fight a fire on a burning PBY Catalina at Naval Air Station (NAS) Kaneohe, Hawaii, 7 December 1941.

Image
View of the battleship Nevada (BB 36) underway during the Pearl Harbor attack, 7 December 1941.

Image
View of PBY Catalina burning at Naval Air Station (NAS) Kaneohe, Territory of Hawaii, following the Japanese attacks on 7 December 1941.

Image
View of the wreckage of an OS2U Kingfisher on Naval Air Station (NAS) Ford Island following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, 7 December 1941.

Image
View of the wreckage of a PBY Catalina of Patrol Squadron (VP) 12 taken at Naval Air Station (NAS) Kaneohe, Hawaii, in the aftermath of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.

Image
View of the wreckage of a PBY Catalina at Naval Air Station (NAS) Kaneohe during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, 7 December 1941.

Image
Cars that were strafed by Japanese aircraft pictured at Naval Air Station (NAS) Kaneohe, Hawaii, in the aftermath of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, 7 December 1941.

Image
Sailors examine the wreckage of an Aichi D3A dive bomber (codenamed Val) that was salvaged from the site where it crashed during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.

Image
Views of scenes at Naval Air Station (NAS) Kaneohe during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.

Image
View of PBY Catalina aircraft at Naval Air Station (NAS) Ford Island next to a hangar under repair taken sometime after the Japanese attack.


Image
View of the salvaging of the capsized battleship Oklahoma (BB 37) during which the ships was rotated to an angle of about 30 degrees, 29 March 1943.

Image
View of U.S. Naval Base Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, just over six months after the Japanese attack.

Image
The Japanese carrier Shokaku pictured under attack by U.S. aircraft during the Battle of Coral Sea 5-8-1942

Image
IJNS Shoho burning during the Battle of Coral Sea after successful attacks by SBD's and TBD Devastator aircraft from the carriers Lexington (CV 2) and Yorktown (CV 5).

Image
This photo shows the front of a TBD-1 in flight over Wake Island.

Image
View of The Bug the OS2U Kingfisher that rescued Captain Eddie Rickenbaker in the Pacific. This aircraft also survived the attack on Pearl Harbor.

Image
View of the Japanese carrier Hiryu burning after being attacked by U.S. Navy aircraft during the Battle of Midway

Image
View of the strike on Rabual taken by Commander Joseph C. Clifton from the cockpit of his F6F-3 Hellcat, 5 November 1943.

Image
Strike photograph showing Japanese ships under attack at Rabaul 11-5-1943

Image
Strike onthe Marshall Islands 1-29-1944

Image
Strike photograph taken by an aircraft of Carrier Air Group (CVG) 2 during a raid against Kwajalein in the Marshall Islands 1944

Image
Strike photograph of raid in Marshall Islands by aircraft off Intrepid (CV 11)

Image
Strike photograph of raid in Marshall Islands by aircraft off Intrepid (CV 11).-1

Image
Strike photograph of raid against Truk by aircraft off Intrepid (CV 11)-1

Image
Strike photograph of raid against Truk by aircraft off Intrepid (CV 11).

Image
Strike photograph of raid against Truk by aircraft off Intrepid (CV 11)-2

Image
Strike photograph of raid against Truk by aircraft off Intrepid (CV 11)-3

Image
Strike photograph of raid against Truk by aircraft off Intrepid (CV 11).

Image
Strike photograph of raid against Truk by aircraft off Intrepid (CV 11) 2-16-1944

Image
SBD-5s of Bombing Squadron Sixteen (VB-16) off USS Lexington (CV-16) fly low over Japanese installations on Param Island, Truk Atoll

Image
Strike photograph probably taken during strikes on the Palau Islands 1944

Image
Strike photograph showing the explosion of a tanker hit by carrier aircraft during a raid on Palau 3-30-1944

Image
Strike against an unknown target 1944

Image
Strike photograph of air raid against Pagan on 24 June 1944.

Image
formation of TBM Avengers from the U.S.S. Hancock, CV-19, Air Group 7 flying support for the invasion of Okinawa

Image
Strike photographs showing ships under attack by planes of Air Group 7 in the harbor at Hong Kong. Dad was involved in some of these missions

Image
Strike photograph taken by planes from Air Group 80 off the carrier Ticonderoga (CV 14) showing smoke over Manila in the Philippines.

Image
A TBF TBM Avenger of Torpedo Squadron (VT) 51, with battle damage visible on its wing, flies over Japanese ships under attack during the Battle of Leyte Gulf.

Image
A TBF TBM Avenger flies past the Japanese carrier Zuikaku as she sinks during the Battle of Leyte Gulf.

Image
Strike photograph shot during a raid by carrier aircraft against Kure on the island of Honshu in Japan 3-19-1945

Image
Ships of the Fifth Fleet at anchor in Ulithi Atoll.

Image
Carrier aircraft pictured in mass formation over ships of the U.S. Pacific Fleet. USS Wasp (CV 18)

Image
Carrier aircraft pictured in mass formation over ships of the U.S. Pacific Fleet.

Image
Formations of U.S. Navy carrier planes roar over USS Missouri (BB 63) anchored in Tokyo Bay for the ceremonies in which the Japanese Empire surrendered to the Allied powers

Image
Photograph taken from USS Missouri (BB 63) showing U.S. Navy carrier planes flying over Tokyo Bay on the day the instrument of surrender was signed,

Image
SB2C-4E of Bombing Squadron 88 (VB-88) in flight over ships of Task Force 58. The mass formation of aircraft might indicate that this photograph was taken on 2 September 1945

Image
TBM-3E Avenger, with Composite Squadron Ten (VC-10), in flight over unidentified CVEs cruising Tokyo Bay after surrender.

_________________
Don't forget to check your own inventory ...


Last edited by Mark Allen M on Thu Dec 06, 2012 1:54 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2012 12:07 am 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member

Joined: Sat Dec 22, 2007 12:36 am
Posts: 7969
Location: Mt. Vernon, WA.
Anyone spot the R3D yet?

_________________
Don't make me go get my flying monkeys-


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2012 12:51 am 
Offline
Sergeant

Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2005 7:51 am
Posts: 59
1st picture


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2012 11:38 am 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member

Joined: Sat Dec 22, 2007 12:36 am
Posts: 7969
Location: Mt. Vernon, WA.
expat wrote:
1st picture

DING-DING-DING :drink3:

_________________
Don't make me go get my flying monkeys-


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2012 12:27 pm 
Offline
Group Captain
User avatar

Joined: Sun May 18, 2008 11:59 am
Posts: 605
Location: West Hammond, Illinois, USA
Thanks for posting. Any pre war THI photos will make me stop what I am doing and look.

TM

_________________
.
.
.

"Welcome back Mr. Lasky."


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2012 6:12 pm 
Offline
3000+ Post Club
3000+ Post Club
User avatar

Joined: Mon May 03, 2004 5:42 pm
Posts: 4422
Location: Waukegan,Illinois
Those are great!

_________________
Ain't no sunshine when she's gone!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2012 12:00 am 
Offline
1000+ Posts!
1000+ Posts!

Joined: Fri Sep 24, 2004 10:11 pm
Posts: 1263
Location: Damascus, MD
The pic of the West Virginia entering Pearl had to have been taken prior to October 1936 as Langley still has its full flight deck in the picture. The forward 40% of the flight deck was removed in the conversion to seaplane tender.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2012 1:50 pm 
Offline
3000+ Post Club
3000+ Post Club
User avatar

Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 1:48 pm
Posts: 3297
Location: On the road
Interesting to note, at least for me. I didn't know there were B-24's, or at least a B-24 at Pearl Harbor during the attack. Very interesting.
Source and a nice site to reflect on some images well seen and a few not so well seen. http://hawaii.gov/hawaiiaviation/aviati ... ber-7-1941


Image
B-24A assigned to the 1st Photo Group 44th Bomb Group arrived at Hickam Field on December 5 1941 to have guns installed prior to continuing to the Philippines to fly recon.

Image
Wrecked hangar with destroyed planes at Wheeler Field December 7 1941

Image
Severely damaged P-36 sits in wrecked hangar at Wheeler Field December 7 1941

Image
Looking out toward Hangar Avenue and the flightline from the courtyard between heavily damaged Wing E and Wing D of the big barracks at Hickam Field December 7 1941

Image
Hangar 35 Dock 1 at Hickam Field with an A-20A aircraft of the 5th Bomb Group on left and O-49 aircraft on right December 7 1941

Image
Close up view of wreckage in Hangar 1 at Wheeler Field December 7 1941 A P-26 is on left with a P-40 in background

Image
Burned out P-40B's in front of Hangar 3 Wheeler Field December 7 1941

_________________
Don't forget to check your own inventory ...


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2012 1:59 pm 
Offline
3000+ Post Club
3000+ Post Club
User avatar

Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 1:48 pm
Posts: 3297
Location: On the road
Nice shot of Pearl Harbor, May 2, 1940

Image

_________________
Don't forget to check your own inventory ...


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2012 2:45 pm 
Offline
1000+ Posts!
1000+ Posts!

Joined: Sat Feb 02, 2008 3:43 pm
Posts: 1629
Location: Santa Monica, CA
Lots of stunning shots, thanks Mark. Probably a separate thread, but the simultaneous attacks on Clark Field, Manila (Dec. Eighth) and Wake Island (Dec. 7) can't compete with the vast number of images that were shot at Pearl Harbor. The lack of iconic photos, IMO, may have contributed to the media to generally forget these attacks, even though it was practically simultaneously. I write this not as an attempt to diminish the attack on Pearl Harbor or what Mark has posted, but rather as only an observation. Like lots of things, things change over time. The reality is the the attack on Pearl Harbor was closer to the continent which carried a greater impact on the imagination, and Pearl Harbor required a greater degree of stealth to accomplish the mission by the Japanese fleet. Of course, the lack of images of Clark and Wake would be a function of being over run by Japanese forces and US personnel being captured and killed. In Wakes case, they were too busy defending themselves to bother with photos. It was another age, with no electronic means to send images that are so ubiquitous now. There are a few photos out there of the attack of Clark, and the destruction on Clark Field photographed later by Japanese forces.

_________________
384th Bomb Group, Inc., Member
http://www.384thbombgroup.com/
http://384thbgveteranssigningproject.blogspot.com/


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2012 3:33 pm 
Offline
3000+ Post Club
3000+ Post Club
User avatar

Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 1:48 pm
Posts: 3297
Location: On the road
Very good points about Wake and the Philippines, here are some nice series from the LIFE archives as to how life was in the Philippines a month before hostilities.

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/33 ... 72f54.html

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/a5 ... c49dd.html

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/b2 ... b3823.html

_________________
Don't forget to check your own inventory ...


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2012 4:03 pm 
Offline
3000+ Post Club
3000+ Post Club
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 12, 2006 9:58 pm
Posts: 3185
Location: Nelson City, Texas
Just wondering after viewing the unreal mass of airplanes flying over the surrender, how many accidents happened that day? Had to have some casualties with that much iron in the air. Has anyone ever heard? A friend of mine viewed the flyover from the deck of the Mississippi, what a sight and sounds that must have been.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2012 6:47 pm 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 11, 2004 5:42 pm
Posts: 6837
Location: The Goldfields, Victoria, Australia
TriangleP wrote:
... the simultaneous attacks on Clark Field, Manila (Dec. Eighth) and Wake Island (Dec. 7) can't compete with the vast number of images that were shot at Pearl Harbor. ...

And even before Pearl, Wake, or Clark was Kota Bharu, and some of the first shots of the Pacific War. (Not to mention the cigarette on a bombing raid story.)

"I think Don Dowey said he lit a cigarette when he took off and he was still smoking it when he came back. That's how close it was."
http://vintageaeroplanewriter.blogspot. ... e-7th.html

Rightly Pearl Harbor is a waypoint of history, but as TriangleP's pointed out, there were other fights, no less desperate and a lot more rearguard.

Regards,

_________________
James K

"Switch on the underwater landing lights"
Emilio Largo, Thunderball.

www.VintageAeroWriter.com


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2012 10:54 pm 
Offline
Flight Lieutenant

Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 12:19 pm
Posts: 131
Location: Canada
Disregard what I wrote below. I scrolled through the other posts to see if it had been brought up (it was) but missed it.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Stupid question: Is the twin engine machine parked beside the Kingfisher at the bottom of the first photo a Douglas DC-5 (or C-110/R3D)?

At first I was thinking A-20 but I'm not sure it's one of those.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2012 11:25 pm 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Tue May 11, 2004 5:42 pm
Posts: 6837
Location: The Goldfields, Victoria, Australia
One has to recognise from the pictures that the Japanese attack was remarkably effective, given the weight of weaponry, number and development of the aircraft that carried it out. Having tested weapons and battle-hardened and experienced airmen increased the attack's efficacy.

The lessons of Taranto were well learned and well-expanded upon. I would image the Italian views of their port the morning after would've been similar, down to the retrieval of an enemy bomber from the water.

As we all know, the critical element was that the carriers were not there. Grievous though the losses to battleships and cruisers and their sailors were, they would not have been as critical in the war as the carriers were to prove.

I wonder if the carriers had been in port, what losses in these vital ships might have been - I'd presume the maximum effect would have been to prolong the Pacific war, as there was no way Japan could have prevailed once the decision by the allies of nothing short of unconditional surrender was a possible objective.

Just a few, random, thoughts.

_________________
James K

"Switch on the underwater landing lights"
Emilio Largo, Thunderball.

www.VintageAeroWriter.com


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 20 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Exabot [Bot], Google Feedfetcher and 30 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group