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PostPosted: Sun Sep 04, 2011 6:14 pm 
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That is a tremendous amount of right aileron being held on the take-off roll. Bad crosswind at DX this day? This is without a doubt my new favorite Spitfire restoration! About the only one I think I may have liked better would have been the Shuttleworth Mk.V BEFORE they put the wing tips back on it and gave it fresh paint.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 10:05 am 
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What I recall of Spitfires with fabric ailerons, they tended to often fly one wing low on first flight. A length of cord was then doped on to the trailing edge of the aileron on the offending wing to trim out the plane. Even on later Spits with metal ailerons, changing an aileron could change the aircraft's flight characteristics.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 1:12 pm 
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C VEICH wrote:
That is a tremendous amount of right aileron being held on the take-off roll. Bad crosswind at DX this day? This is without a doubt my new favorite Spitfire restoration! About the only one I think I may have liked better would have been the Shuttleworth Mk.V BEFORE they put the wing tips back on it and gave it fresh paint.


What are the chances that the pilot has added the aileron to offset the torque of the engine? I know that if I don't use a substantial amount of alieron on takeoff, the left tire on the RV-6 wears out pretty rapidly.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 2:34 pm 
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PeterA posted a lovely shot of P9374 over on Flypast forum.....

:drink3:

Image


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 06, 2011 4:08 pm 
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The aircraft is painted in the early one wing black / one white scheme ~ it's going to look stunning when the
autumn sun kisses the underside paint against a blue sky.


What's the story behind the 1/2 black and 1/2 white underside paint? Why did they do that, and was it common for awhile?

Thanks...
--Tom


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 06, 2011 6:03 pm 
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Sasquatch wrote:
Quote:
The aircraft is painted in the early one wing black / one white scheme ~ it's going to look stunning when the
autumn sun kisses the underside paint against a blue sky.


What's the story behind the 1/2 black and 1/2 white underside paint? Why did they do that, and was it common for awhile?

Thanks...
--Tom


Basically it was recognition device, much like the black/white invasion stripes applied for D-Day.

Starting appearing in late 1938 and continued up to the start of the Battle of Britain, after which it largely disappeared for that summer, but was partly reintroduced for the winter of 40/41.

This thread from just a few months back, will give you most of the answers, and worth the read if only for the fact that it was started by a wartime veteran pilot (and at the time keen photograher) - which given his 90+ age now, is internet gold IMHO :supz:

http://forum.keypublishing.co.uk/showthread.php?t=110667


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 07, 2011 8:46 am 
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What is great with the British warbirds is that they are always painted with the right colors, without overchroming or "fun" markings like sharkmouth, modern pinups or personal things.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 07, 2011 10:19 am 
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Firebird wrote:
Sasquatch wrote:
Quote:
The aircraft is painted in the early one wing black / one white scheme ~ it's going to look stunning when the
autumn sun kisses the underside paint against a blue sky.


What's the story behind the 1/2 black and 1/2 white underside paint? Why did they do that, and was it common for awhile?

Thanks...
--Tom


Basically it was recognition device, much like the black/white invasion stripes applied for D-Day.

Starting appearing in late 1938 and continued up to the start of the Battle of Britain, after which it largely disappeared for that summer, but was partly reintroduced for the winter of 40/41.

This thread from just a few months back, will give you most of the answers, and worth the read if only for the fact that it was started by a wartime veteran pilot (and at the time keen photograher) - which given his 90+ age now, is internet gold IMHO :supz:

http://forum.keypublishing.co.uk/showthread.php?t=110667


Thanks Firebird...appreciate the explanation and link!

--Tom

Further note....
Oh my...I started in at that link...I am going to be totally useless today! I've been re-watching "Piece of Cake" and that link ties in perfectly. You made my day, Firebird...many thanks!! :drink3:


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 07, 2011 10:45 am 
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Everyday I come to this site and see something fascinating and educational...but this...this is just....wow! Peter, thanks so much for sharing. You're in a very unique situation to be able to take these shots and I'm sure we're all very thankful (and perhaps a bit jealous ;) ) that you are!


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 07, 2011 9:36 pm 
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ChrisDNT wrote:
What is great with the British warbirds is that they are always painted with the right colors, without overchroming or "fun" markings like sharkmouth, modern pinups or personal things.


I could not agree more. You won't see a Spitfire in the UK restored with the hideous nose art seen on most of the Tigercats in the US, for example. I have a lot of respect for the people who restore aircraft like this Spitfire to a stock appearance and honor its history. Beautiful (and very historic) aircraft.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 07, 2011 9:59 pm 
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kalamazookid wrote:
ChrisDNT wrote:
What is great with the British warbirds is that they are always painted with the right colors, without overchroming or "fun" markings like sharkmouth, modern pinups or personal things.


I could not agree more. You won't see a Spitfire in the UK restored with the hideous nose art seen on most of the Tigercats in the US, for example. I have a lot of respect for the people who restore aircraft like this Spitfire to a stock appearance and honor its history. Beautiful (and very historic) aircraft.

One thing about I learned about the UK registered warbirds from what paperwork came with SM969-
They have to ask permission from the RAF or MOD to paint in RAF colors and schemes.
The paperwork gets submitted with drawings and specs before paint.
After approval then this info is also forwarded to the CAA and is included with that paperwork as well. It also has something to do with being able to be flown with out the National Registration being painted on the exterior in some cases.
If this is indeed the process I assume to get RAF approval you probably need to fairly accurate on paint colors and markings. Obviously the Spitfire I is above the top accurate and detailed beyond what is required but there seems to be a degree of dealing with rules and regulations involved over there in how you paint.
In the US none of this is needed to paint an aircraft. The owner gets to do as they wish. Only rules pertain to how the N number is applied and a N can't be apart of some types of markings. In the case of a Spit XIV that the CAF has now in Calif, when 1st assembled here for David Price they couldn't display the serial number since it had an N in it. NHXXX or HNXXX. The N had to be painted out in that serial number on the side of the fus. That was back in the 80s.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 08, 2011 2:54 pm 
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I didn't get any pix of the previous test flight ~ I'd just sat down to scoff my packed lunch at a picnic table when it happened.

Today however ~ I'd just come out of Hangar 5 in time to see it getting airbourne :D

Image

This seemed to be the longest flight yet ( approx 30 mins ) and a beautiful barrel-roll out over the practice area was followed by a few mins over the airfield.

Image

And then in for a perfect 3 point landing

Image

Image

Image

Image

Good weather is forecast for Friday Sept 9th.

I'm keeping everything crossed that we get to see another flight by this wonderful aircraft :wink:

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 08, 2011 8:13 pm 
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Bomberflight,

Great shots. I love the head-on taxi shot that shows the underside of the wings.

Chappie

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 09, 2011 9:56 am 
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IIRC, didn't the Spitfire Mark I have a two bladed prop?

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 09, 2011 10:18 am 
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Jack Frost wrote:
IIRC, didn't the Spitfire Mark I have a two bladed prop?

Originally yes but as new technology progressed I believe all were fitted with the improved controllable 3 bladed prop with a later engine that allowed the prop gov to be fitted.
I'm not the best with remembering the earlier Merlin history so someone can correct this if it is wrong.
I believe that is how this aircraft was setup when it decided to go on an extended holiday at the shore.

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